This Aiden Maple floor from our Vintage Couture collection was installed using the tongue and groove method.

This Aiden Maple floor from our Vintage Couture collection was installed using the tongue and groove method.

In the previous post, we talked about the advantages as well as the setbacks of the new and innovative “click together” locking system. The advantages of this style include a click and lock system that makes it easier for people who want to try their hand at DIY floor installation to avoid using messy glues or adhesives. However, there were some setbacks to the click together style flooring that might push some customers in the direction of the more traditional tongue and groove style flooring. Today, we’ll inform you about the advantages as well as the setbacks of tongue and groove style flooring.

With tongue and groove floors, there are several factors to consider when comparing them to click-lock flooring. Tongue and groove flooring tends to be cheaper because its cost to flooring manufacturers is less than that of click-together floors. However, the cost which can run 8 to 15 cents per linear foot adds up quickly and can make a significant difference to people looking to install flooring in multiple rooms. However, the prime benefit is that tongue and groove floors that are floated will not squeak due to the locking system loosening up. In addition, tongue and groove floors that have been floated will provide much better moisture protection from spills. The reason for this is that the glue acts as a barrier and does not allow the moisture to get under the flooring nearly as easy.

The main setback that comes with tongue and groove style flooring has to do with repairs. Repairing tongue & groove wood floors can be tricky, considering the floor panels or planks are glued together for stability. Floating floors aren’t stuck to the subfloor, but in order to replace or repair a board in the middle of your flooring, the installer will often need to break apart multiple pieces to get access.

Now that you know the “good” and the “bad” about click together and tongue and groove style installations, you will be able to make the most educated decision that works best when trying to float your new wood floor. For any further questions or concerns regarding these two installation methods, please contact a simpleFLOORS personal flooring consultant at 800-220-7112.